Bitte beachten Sie: Diese Website benötigt Flash und JavaScript für ihre volle Funktionalität.
Bitte stellen Sie sicher, dass Flash und JavaScript in den Browser-Einstellungen aktiviert sind.
Zum Download des aktuellen Flash-Plugins hier klicken.

Inside an electric car

What makes an electric car different from a conventional automobile? It’s hard to tell from the outside. So let’s have a look at the inside of an e-up!

look inside an electric car
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Close

On-board battery

A lithium-ion battery is located under the back seat and in the mid-portion of the underbody. The battery has a capacity of 18.7-kilowatt hours, and can travel up to 160 kilometres on a charge.

Close

Charging socket

The e-up! has a socket instead of a petrol tank cap for “filling” up on electricity.

Close

High-voltage cable

A high-voltage cable connects the charging station to the battery. Some 324 volts of electricity then flow through another cable into the motor.

Close

Battery Management System (BMS)

An interface between the car and the battery that monitors battery activity at all times. The charge level can be checked by remote from a smartphone app.

Close

Heating system

Heated seats and a heated windshield ensure that warmth is efficiently distributed to where it is needed most in the passenger cabin.

Close

Power electronics module

This is essential for the performance of an electric motor. It controls the energy flow between the battery and the motor and uses a converter to produce 12 volt AC for electronic systems beyond the battery itself.

Close

Motor compartment

All important parts and ancillary components are housed in the motor compartment. The electric motor, gearbox, differential gear and the power electronics module form the core of the drive system.

Close

Electric motor

Unlike internal combustion engines, electric motors have full torque the minute they start moving. This enhances the driving experience. With the e-up!, 210 Newton meters of torque are available, meaning it only takes about five seconds to accelerate to 60 kilometres per hour.

Close

Recuperation

Kinetic energy from braking and coasting is transformed into electric energy and stored for later in the ride. A switch on the gear lever allows the driver to regulate the amount of energy to be recovered in three levels.  Greater recuperation means more energy is recovered and also more braking power.